Do you know a hero?

April 22, 2012

I am pleased to offer a beautiful thank you contest for my fans.  I appreciate all of those who serve our country, and one of the vendors I work with does as well.

If you know someone who serves our country, or has served our country and want to honor them with this special gift, this is what you need to do.

Please go to my facebook page and become a fan if you aren’t already,  post a photo of the hero you are nominating for the gift as well as a paragraph of why your hero deserves additional honor.  I will select 4 servicemen, servicewomen or veterans to receive a 12×12 wrapped canvas with their photo in the center of an image of a flag with the following quote:

I like to see a man proud of the place in which he lives.

I like to see a man live so that his place will be proud of him.

- Quote by Abraham Lincoln

I appreciate all of those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country, and this is one way I can give back with the support of one AWESOME vendor I work with.

Contest winners will be announced on Memorial Day, May 28th, 2012.

Have you ever wanted to learn or practice lifestyle photography?  This is in the moment, candid photos taken of subjects without much posing.  For our April PUG, we will be photographing a few children at the Layton Park on April 25th from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m.  Because summer is almost here, I have had a lot of people ask how to capture children in runnign and playing on a playground, outside, etc.  So here is your chance to come and experiment.

Please RSVP, so I know how many to count on.

801-349-0718

http://www.laytoncity.org/public/depts/parksrec/cityparks/laytoncommons.aspx

Looking forward, in May we will be doing lighting 101!

Andrea

Hello fellow PUG Members! Our March PUG meeting will be at The Festival of Colors in Spanish Fork on March 25th from noon to 4pm.

The address is:  311 W 8500 S

Spanish Fork, UT 84660

Here are directions to the temple:
http://maps.google.com/maps?q=311+W+8500+S,+Spanish+Fork,+UT&hl=en&ll=40.07583,-111.660072&spn=0.005147,0.011362&sll=40.003362,-111.54683&sspn=0.659566,1.454315&t=h&z=17
Please arrive early as you will have to take a shuttle bus to the temple!
I need an RSVP to know who to plan on attending!
andrea@andreahanksphotography.com
801-349-0718
Now some tips on How to protect your camera, courtesy of Scott Jarvie.
People always ask me about keeping the camera safe??

The safest thing you can do is to not own a camera to worry about.

Personally, I really don’t worry about it… tons of people that bring their camera and if they’re not stupid they’re just fine.

I will NOT try to convince you to come… some people will remain paranoid no matter what. I will not try to talk sense into you. If logic can’t save you then just don’t come, or come and don’t shoot, or come and buy a underwater bag.

But below I will give you the perfect TIPS on how to be SMART

BTW it’s not smart to be in the middle of the crowd with no protection and a external zoom lens… but you can always NOT be in the middle of the crowd.

For those that are concerned

I would NOT recomend the following

  • Using external zoom lenses
  • Going into the middle of the crowd
  • Changing lenses
  • Changing memory cards
  • Using a neckstrap you don’t want stained
  • Not using gaffer tape on sensetive areas

As for me

  • I wear an open jacket to tuck the camera
  • I put filters on the lenses. (Even a cheap one just for the day)
  • I don’t use an external zoom lens (so no 24-70) and I’d be risky to use my 14-24 but the other 5-6 lenses are fair game.
  • I gaffer tape flash pop up, battery area, memory card area and external plug in sections.
  • I put syran wrap around where the lens connects and remove it when I want to change lenses
  • I change lenses in a safe environment
  • I air compressor or comressed air to blow off entire camera prior to changing lenses and when I’m done for the day.
  • I get a sensor cleaning

Thanks for the great information Jarvie!!!!

I hope to see you all there!!!

 

Enjoy a small sampling of my work from New York Fashion Week in September, featuring collections for Spring Summer 2012. I shot and edited backstage beauty, celebrities, Fashion’s Night out and more than 45 runway shows. WHEWWW! Stay tuned for photos from this season!

Let’s end our 2011 PUG year with a bang and get together for food, fun and a little bit of planning for 2012!

We will be meeting on December 28th at 6:30 p.m. at The Sonora Grill in Ogden!  The PUG will be providing chips, salsa, drinks and hors d’oevres!  Let’s review 2011 and talk about the upcoming 2012 year and what kind of topics, meetings and events you would like to have for our Salt Lake City PUG! This is your chance to have your voice heard!

The address to The Sonora Grill is: 2310 S. Kiesel Ave. Ogden, UT 84401

PLEASE RSVP so I know how many to count on!  andrea@andreahanksphotography.com or 801-349-0718.

Happy Holidays and here’s to having a wonderful 2012!

This article was originally featured on Pictage’s Blog and I loved the two different philosophy’s discussed here about turn aroudn times. Please feel free to leave a comment on what you do, or as a client what

Let’s bust a myth. There’s no right way to run your photography business.

Many self-proclaimed leaders make a boatload of money selling formulas for running your business. Well, here at The Photo Life, we don’t believe in secret formulas or overnight success stories. We believe the only right way of doing business is the one that serves your unique clients and grows your business the old-fashioned way. Hard work and happy clients are your foundation for success.

Different systems work for different studios, so the key is finding one that suits your clients and your business!

That’s why we’re eager to bring you the first of many “Town Hall Debates” here on The Photo Life. Town Hall Debates are a fun way of giving you an opportunity to learn how others do business.

This week’s debate is all about turnaround times. Kevin and David run successful businesses. Their systems work for them and their clients. Yet their viewpoints are very different. Do you agree or disagree, based on your unique business experience? Weigh in by leaving comments below!

MEET KEVIN SWAN

“Speed trumps quality in the real world of delivering images to wedding clients. Every hour that passes after the event makes your hard work less relevant. Learn to move faster.”

Photographer Kevin Swan

Kevin came out of a grueling 15 years in advertising, applying his hard-won experience to launch Swan PhotoKISS Books, and now Black Swan.

Wedding Photographer Kevin Swan

MEET DAVE WITTIG

“Yes, McDonalds can get you a burger in under 60 seconds, but I don’t think McDondalds is on most people’s list of favorite dining experiences.”

Photographer David Wittig

Chicago-based wedding photographers David Wittig and Nancy Beale, have been working side-by-side, capturing weddings and transforming them into art for the last ten years. Their own relationship, a myriad of friendship, partnership and marriage, aides their images, providing two perspectives of a singular moment—what can often be the most important moment of your life. Dave and Nancy have shot weddings from Maine to California, from India to France, and are always excited to add another stamp to their all-ready full passports. Their work, which examines a documentary feel and editorial style, is heavily influenced by their fine art backgrounds and training.


Wedding Photography by David Wittig

1) How quickly do you deliver images to your clients? What is your method for delivering the first images?

KEVIN’S ANSWER:

  1. Saturday: Slideshow at the reception, typically we present 30-50 images with quick edits done in LR or Aperture.
  2. Monday: 5-10 favorites images – usually from slideshow – posted to Facebook and tagged.
  3. Thursday: Draft #1 of clients’ album is presented online – approximately 100 images – without the ability to comment. We use SWAT’s “public” slideshow feature.
  4. Monday: Balance of clients’ images released online for them to start making album edits.
  5. Monday: Send clients a link to the slideshow where they can make comments and edits. We use SWAT’s “approval” slideshow feature.

There are many reasons for my workflow, but they center around album sales. My clients average $6-10k in album purchases on top of my shooting fees. By only giving them a small taste of their images (the Facebook post), when they see their album draft a few days after the wedding, they’re blown away!

I choose my favorite images and design a spectacular book. If you let your client choose the images, they typically take a long time and often pick mediocre shots because they’re inexperienced and choosing for political/family reasons—not for aesthetics. In my opinion, it’s a burden on your client to force them to choose their favorites for the album. They’ve put enough effort into making decisions for the wedding. As professionals, we should help and guide them—not drop more work in their laps!

It’s easier to edit a designed album than it is to start from scratch. By enabling clients to view their album early, they’re still emotionally engaged with their images. While the rest of the images are uploading to an online service to display photos and sell prints, your clients watch the album slideshow again and again, imagining it as their book more and more. By the time other images are ready to review, the clients are ready to make a few changes, but it’s tough to cut the album down any significant amount.

Customers all know what’s possible; they know how fast things can turn around. They want images on their phones and on Facebook sooner rather than later. Uncle Bob is at their wedding, and he’s shooting photos with his phone or his Rebel XTI and posting them on Facebook the same day. By the time you play around with your images, add your special sauce, make the white balance perfect in every photo, run noise filters, sharpen edges, and so on, your photos become irrelevant. You can post them to Facebook, but people are like, “Oh yeah, I remember that. Already saw it.”

The bride prefers high-quality images, but she’ll take whatever is first. The streams of Twitter and Facebook are living things, and whatever is NOW is what matters most. Posting images a few weeks later is far less important, impacting or valuable. Since Facebook is becoming the operating system of the web, I believe our businesses need simple, direct tie-ins. For example, I post slideshows directly onto my Facebook wall using SWAT. My goal is to make it simple for clients to post images on Facebook that are automatically tagged to me and my sites. This extra marketing results in additional bookings. I’d never suggest giving your clients mediocre work; the trick is learning how to produce excellent work quickly.

Speed trumps quality in the real world of delivering images to wedding clients. Every hour that passes after the event makes your hard work less relevant. Learn to move faster.

Wedding Photographer Kevin Swan

DAVE’S ANSWER:

The full set of images is usually completed in 8-10 weeks. During our busiest times, it is usually 10 weeks.

Clients get a preview of images on our blog about 4 weeks after the wedding. At this point we have  culled all of the final images and have gone through that set and selected 10-15 images that really stood out to us. It’s not an overview of the day, just the very best images. Then 6-8 weeks after the wedding we post a slideshow (using a service called Fotagraft.com) on our blog of about 100-150 images (depending on the event).

Wedding Photography by David Wittig

2) How quickly do you deliver physical products to your clients?

KEVIN’S ANSWER:

If they approve the album within a few days of receiving the first design, I can have the books in their hands within 3 weeks of the wedding. Plus, I have financial incentives in place to help prompt clients to make decisions quickly. I focus primarily on books, not on canvases or prints.

DAVE’S ANSWER:

As soon as we have completed editing the full set of images, clients can begin the ordering process. From this point on, the biggest factor in turn around time is our client’s response time (which varies greatly), and our vendor’s production times. Our albums take 8-12 weeks to print and bind, and canvases take a week from ordering time. Because we have everything all edited the ordering process is quick and easy.

3) How do you communicate turnaround times to clients? Do you explain your philosophy to them?

KEVIN’S ANSWER:

I always under-promise and over-deliver. KISS turns albums around in 2 weeks, so I tell my clients 5-6 weeks. This way, if something goes wrong, I have time to start over and still meet or exceed their expectations. If everything goes right, I get to blow them away by delivering earlier than anticipated.

DAVE’S ANSWER:

Yes, we consider the time and care we put into individually preparing each image to be an important selling point, and a differentiating factor from a lot of our competition. We want our clients to know that we spend more time on their images than others, and as a result the process takes longer. We discuss this in our first consultation with them. Most of our clients readily understand that speed almost always has a negative tradeoff. Yes, McDonalds can get you a burger in under 60 seconds, but I don’t think McDondalds is on most people’s list of favorite dining experiences.

4) Do you outsource your post-production or do you do it yourself in-house?

KEVIN’S ANSWER:

It’s a mix. I have an editor in-house, but I also do my own editing. I’ve also used Photographer’s Edit, which I enjoyed, but the turnaround time didn’t work well with my desire to get albums online the week after the wedding. Album design used to be entirely outsourced because it was a nightmare, but with SWAT, I’ve gone back to doing it myself.

Wedding Photography by Kevin Swan

DAVE’S ANSWER:

No, we do everything in-house ourselves. We do not outsource our post-processing. While there are certainly advantages to outsourcing post-production (principally in terms of speed and cost), we have been unable to find any service that has an acceptable degree of quality and consistency. Admittedly, we have very high standards, but so do our clients. Trading quality for speed or cost savings is not in the best interest of our clients, even if it would lighten our workload. When you think about the fact that we are preparing images that will likely last multiple generations – 100 to 200 years, it seems absurd to sacrifice even the slightest bit of quality get things 3 or 4 weeks faster. 150 years is 7800 weeks, which means that when we are discussing 4 weeks we are talking about .0005 or less of an image’s lifespan. All the arguments I’ve ever heard for outsourcing relate to how a photographer’s life is made easier, or how their profitability increases, you never hear about why it might be better for a client. I believe that’s because it isn’t better for a client (unless the photographer is simply bad at color correcting).

Wedding Photography by David Wittig

5) Do you use Lightroom and Photoshop? Or just one or the other? Why?

KEVIN’S ANSWER:

I’m versed in Lightroom, Aperture and Photoshop. We don’t use Photoshop in my studio; it’s too slow. I personally prefer Aperture, but  we use Lightroom frequently too.

Aperture has a more consistent, pleasing UI—which is very important to me. If you’re using a program for several hours at a time, the better it looks and feels, the more enjoyable your task becomes.

DAVE’S ANSWER:
Neither, we use Aperture and haven’t opened Photoshop in months. Photoshop is an extremely inefficient way to edit large quantities of images (and even small numbers of images). We can do everything we need to in Aperture, from culling, color correcting, adding film grain, and album design, to organizing, categorizing, backing up, and archiving our images. It may not be the absolute best in each of those categories (though it’s usually the in the top 2) but the efficiency that is gained by having one highly integrated tool is very worthwhile.

Do you agree or disagree, based on your unique business experience? Weigh in by leaving comments below!


Hello there!

It is Novemeber, and the days are getting shorter. Daylight savings time is now in effect as well and as photographers we all know the optimum time for shooting ends much earlier than we would like for outdoor portrait sessions! Because of this, I have decided to move our PUG Meeting to Saturday, November 26th at 11:00 a.m.

Because this meeting will be held at a private residence, PLEASE message me for directions and an address. It is in East Layton, Utah.

Topics we will be covering:

New Pictage Products and Services (There are a BUNCH! YAY!)
How to obtain a correct white balance in the snow
How to coreectly espose subjects properly with snow
and How to photograph moving subjects.

We have the FABULOUS opportunity to photograph two hourses, a model in a red cape with white fur trim and hopefully we will have oodles of snow as well!

If you are in town after Turkey Day and need some inspiration, please join us and bring a friend!

Andrea

To see the article online click here.

 Lily Bride Designs

PURE . SIMPLE . ELEGANT . Follow my adventures in taking the Utah Bridal market by surprise with my unique wedding gowns and accessories.

Thursday, July 7, 2011

Updates! on photos that is!!


I need and want to take some time to credit all the awesome photographers who helped me create these beautiful images for my portfolio this last year. I have worked with some truly gifted artist, I’m so grateful for the time they put into making my gowns look their best. So each week, I will post a new post featuring work from each of these photographers and why I think they totally rock! So above are some the wonderful work I have received in using my first featured photographer…….

Andrea Hanks Photography:
Andrea has quickly become a well know wedding and fashion photographer, a great friend as well as someone who I completely trust in my vision for each project I work with her on. She is so much fun to work with and really makes an effort to take on my angles, (even when they don’t work!) I would highly recommend her to trust with your one special day. She has been flown out to many destination weddings and is a house photographer for LookBookLA.com and attends both fall and spring fashion week to snap shots of LA’s fashion elite and its’ up and coming star designers.
You can view more on Andrea’s work on her website, by clicking here.

To see this article online go here.

Lily Bride Designs

PURE . SIMPLE . ELEGANT . Follow my adventures in taking the Utah Bridal market by surprise with my unique wedding gowns and accessories.

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

The fabulous Andrea Hanks, helped me create these beautiful images last month; so I could have some amazing images for my portfolio for the fantasy tutu I created for Ballet West’s fundraiser. I was chosen to create the tutu earlier this year and after a sleep-less night or two to figure out how to sew up that amazing skirt, this is the end result.


The model who wore it at the fashion show asked me what inspired me to make the tutu. I was inspired by many things, using what I had on hand, a friends wedding dress I recently altered, Film Noir and I wanted to use feathers, as I was entranced by all the beautiful tutus the costume designer made for the Oscar nominated film The Black Swan. Here is the blurb I attached to the sketch I turned in.


This asymmetrical designed two-piece corset and skirt in iridescent red taffeta, and black tulle skirt in descending layers and feather accents is inspired by old Hollywood, and features a playful twist on the classic tutu. The bodice is ruched with bias strips folded to add dimension, an off the shoulder fan of tulle and feathers nicely frames the décolletage bringing the eye to the mini full circle skirt with it’s descending and angled layers of black tulle.

To view this online go here.

Candlelight Video

This is a video from two of our photographers, Andrea Hanks & Nathan Pickett at Candlelight Serenade 2010

Candlelight Serenade from Nathan Pickett and Andrea Hanks.