Archive for the ‘Tips for photographers’ Category

Hello fellow PUG Members! Our March PUG meeting will be at The Festival of Colors in Spanish Fork on March 25th from noon to 4pm.

The address is:  311 W 8500 S

Spanish Fork, UT 84660

Here are directions to the temple:
http://maps.google.com/maps?q=311+W+8500+S,+Spanish+Fork,+UT&hl=en&ll=40.07583,-111.660072&spn=0.005147,0.011362&sll=40.003362,-111.54683&sspn=0.659566,1.454315&t=h&z=17
Please arrive early as you will have to take a shuttle bus to the temple!
I need an RSVP to know who to plan on attending!
andrea@andreahanksphotography.com
801-349-0718
Now some tips on How to protect your camera, courtesy of Scott Jarvie.
People always ask me about keeping the camera safe??

The safest thing you can do is to not own a camera to worry about.

Personally, I really don’t worry about it… tons of people that bring their camera and if they’re not stupid they’re just fine.

I will NOT try to convince you to come… some people will remain paranoid no matter what. I will not try to talk sense into you. If logic can’t save you then just don’t come, or come and don’t shoot, or come and buy a underwater bag.

But below I will give you the perfect TIPS on how to be SMART

BTW it’s not smart to be in the middle of the crowd with no protection and a external zoom lens… but you can always NOT be in the middle of the crowd.

For those that are concerned

I would NOT recomend the following

  • Using external zoom lenses
  • Going into the middle of the crowd
  • Changing lenses
  • Changing memory cards
  • Using a neckstrap you don’t want stained
  • Not using gaffer tape on sensetive areas

As for me

  • I wear an open jacket to tuck the camera
  • I put filters on the lenses. (Even a cheap one just for the day)
  • I don’t use an external zoom lens (so no 24-70) and I’d be risky to use my 14-24 but the other 5-6 lenses are fair game.
  • I gaffer tape flash pop up, battery area, memory card area and external plug in sections.
  • I put syran wrap around where the lens connects and remove it when I want to change lenses
  • I change lenses in a safe environment
  • I air compressor or comressed air to blow off entire camera prior to changing lenses and when I’m done for the day.
  • I get a sensor cleaning

Thanks for the great information Jarvie!!!!

I hope to see you all there!!!

 

Let’s end our 2011 PUG year with a bang and get together for food, fun and a little bit of planning for 2012!

We will be meeting on December 28th at 6:30 p.m. at The Sonora Grill in Ogden!  The PUG will be providing chips, salsa, drinks and hors d’oevres!  Let’s review 2011 and talk about the upcoming 2012 year and what kind of topics, meetings and events you would like to have for our Salt Lake City PUG! This is your chance to have your voice heard!

The address to The Sonora Grill is: 2310 S. Kiesel Ave. Ogden, UT 84401

PLEASE RSVP so I know how many to count on!  andrea@andreahanksphotography.com or 801-349-0718.

Happy Holidays and here’s to having a wonderful 2012!

This article was originally featured on Pictage’s Blog and I loved the two different philosophy’s discussed here about turn aroudn times. Please feel free to leave a comment on what you do, or as a client what

Let’s bust a myth. There’s no right way to run your photography business.

Many self-proclaimed leaders make a boatload of money selling formulas for running your business. Well, here at The Photo Life, we don’t believe in secret formulas or overnight success stories. We believe the only right way of doing business is the one that serves your unique clients and grows your business the old-fashioned way. Hard work and happy clients are your foundation for success.

Different systems work for different studios, so the key is finding one that suits your clients and your business!

That’s why we’re eager to bring you the first of many “Town Hall Debates” here on The Photo Life. Town Hall Debates are a fun way of giving you an opportunity to learn how others do business.

This week’s debate is all about turnaround times. Kevin and David run successful businesses. Their systems work for them and their clients. Yet their viewpoints are very different. Do you agree or disagree, based on your unique business experience? Weigh in by leaving comments below!

MEET KEVIN SWAN

“Speed trumps quality in the real world of delivering images to wedding clients. Every hour that passes after the event makes your hard work less relevant. Learn to move faster.”

Photographer Kevin Swan

Kevin came out of a grueling 15 years in advertising, applying his hard-won experience to launch Swan PhotoKISS Books, and now Black Swan.

Wedding Photographer Kevin Swan

MEET DAVE WITTIG

“Yes, McDonalds can get you a burger in under 60 seconds, but I don’t think McDondalds is on most people’s list of favorite dining experiences.”

Photographer David Wittig

Chicago-based wedding photographers David Wittig and Nancy Beale, have been working side-by-side, capturing weddings and transforming them into art for the last ten years. Their own relationship, a myriad of friendship, partnership and marriage, aides their images, providing two perspectives of a singular moment—what can often be the most important moment of your life. Dave and Nancy have shot weddings from Maine to California, from India to France, and are always excited to add another stamp to their all-ready full passports. Their work, which examines a documentary feel and editorial style, is heavily influenced by their fine art backgrounds and training.


Wedding Photography by David Wittig

1) How quickly do you deliver images to your clients? What is your method for delivering the first images?

KEVIN’S ANSWER:

  1. Saturday: Slideshow at the reception, typically we present 30-50 images with quick edits done in LR or Aperture.
  2. Monday: 5-10 favorites images – usually from slideshow – posted to Facebook and tagged.
  3. Thursday: Draft #1 of clients’ album is presented online – approximately 100 images – without the ability to comment. We use SWAT’s “public” slideshow feature.
  4. Monday: Balance of clients’ images released online for them to start making album edits.
  5. Monday: Send clients a link to the slideshow where they can make comments and edits. We use SWAT’s “approval” slideshow feature.

There are many reasons for my workflow, but they center around album sales. My clients average $6-10k in album purchases on top of my shooting fees. By only giving them a small taste of their images (the Facebook post), when they see their album draft a few days after the wedding, they’re blown away!

I choose my favorite images and design a spectacular book. If you let your client choose the images, they typically take a long time and often pick mediocre shots because they’re inexperienced and choosing for political/family reasons—not for aesthetics. In my opinion, it’s a burden on your client to force them to choose their favorites for the album. They’ve put enough effort into making decisions for the wedding. As professionals, we should help and guide them—not drop more work in their laps!

It’s easier to edit a designed album than it is to start from scratch. By enabling clients to view their album early, they’re still emotionally engaged with their images. While the rest of the images are uploading to an online service to display photos and sell prints, your clients watch the album slideshow again and again, imagining it as their book more and more. By the time other images are ready to review, the clients are ready to make a few changes, but it’s tough to cut the album down any significant amount.

Customers all know what’s possible; they know how fast things can turn around. They want images on their phones and on Facebook sooner rather than later. Uncle Bob is at their wedding, and he’s shooting photos with his phone or his Rebel XTI and posting them on Facebook the same day. By the time you play around with your images, add your special sauce, make the white balance perfect in every photo, run noise filters, sharpen edges, and so on, your photos become irrelevant. You can post them to Facebook, but people are like, “Oh yeah, I remember that. Already saw it.”

The bride prefers high-quality images, but she’ll take whatever is first. The streams of Twitter and Facebook are living things, and whatever is NOW is what matters most. Posting images a few weeks later is far less important, impacting or valuable. Since Facebook is becoming the operating system of the web, I believe our businesses need simple, direct tie-ins. For example, I post slideshows directly onto my Facebook wall using SWAT. My goal is to make it simple for clients to post images on Facebook that are automatically tagged to me and my sites. This extra marketing results in additional bookings. I’d never suggest giving your clients mediocre work; the trick is learning how to produce excellent work quickly.

Speed trumps quality in the real world of delivering images to wedding clients. Every hour that passes after the event makes your hard work less relevant. Learn to move faster.

Wedding Photographer Kevin Swan

DAVE’S ANSWER:

The full set of images is usually completed in 8-10 weeks. During our busiest times, it is usually 10 weeks.

Clients get a preview of images on our blog about 4 weeks after the wedding. At this point we have  culled all of the final images and have gone through that set and selected 10-15 images that really stood out to us. It’s not an overview of the day, just the very best images. Then 6-8 weeks after the wedding we post a slideshow (using a service called Fotagraft.com) on our blog of about 100-150 images (depending on the event).

Wedding Photography by David Wittig

2) How quickly do you deliver physical products to your clients?

KEVIN’S ANSWER:

If they approve the album within a few days of receiving the first design, I can have the books in their hands within 3 weeks of the wedding. Plus, I have financial incentives in place to help prompt clients to make decisions quickly. I focus primarily on books, not on canvases or prints.

DAVE’S ANSWER:

As soon as we have completed editing the full set of images, clients can begin the ordering process. From this point on, the biggest factor in turn around time is our client’s response time (which varies greatly), and our vendor’s production times. Our albums take 8-12 weeks to print and bind, and canvases take a week from ordering time. Because we have everything all edited the ordering process is quick and easy.

3) How do you communicate turnaround times to clients? Do you explain your philosophy to them?

KEVIN’S ANSWER:

I always under-promise and over-deliver. KISS turns albums around in 2 weeks, so I tell my clients 5-6 weeks. This way, if something goes wrong, I have time to start over and still meet or exceed their expectations. If everything goes right, I get to blow them away by delivering earlier than anticipated.

DAVE’S ANSWER:

Yes, we consider the time and care we put into individually preparing each image to be an important selling point, and a differentiating factor from a lot of our competition. We want our clients to know that we spend more time on their images than others, and as a result the process takes longer. We discuss this in our first consultation with them. Most of our clients readily understand that speed almost always has a negative tradeoff. Yes, McDonalds can get you a burger in under 60 seconds, but I don’t think McDondalds is on most people’s list of favorite dining experiences.

4) Do you outsource your post-production or do you do it yourself in-house?

KEVIN’S ANSWER:

It’s a mix. I have an editor in-house, but I also do my own editing. I’ve also used Photographer’s Edit, which I enjoyed, but the turnaround time didn’t work well with my desire to get albums online the week after the wedding. Album design used to be entirely outsourced because it was a nightmare, but with SWAT, I’ve gone back to doing it myself.

Wedding Photography by Kevin Swan

DAVE’S ANSWER:

No, we do everything in-house ourselves. We do not outsource our post-processing. While there are certainly advantages to outsourcing post-production (principally in terms of speed and cost), we have been unable to find any service that has an acceptable degree of quality and consistency. Admittedly, we have very high standards, but so do our clients. Trading quality for speed or cost savings is not in the best interest of our clients, even if it would lighten our workload. When you think about the fact that we are preparing images that will likely last multiple generations – 100 to 200 years, it seems absurd to sacrifice even the slightest bit of quality get things 3 or 4 weeks faster. 150 years is 7800 weeks, which means that when we are discussing 4 weeks we are talking about .0005 or less of an image’s lifespan. All the arguments I’ve ever heard for outsourcing relate to how a photographer’s life is made easier, or how their profitability increases, you never hear about why it might be better for a client. I believe that’s because it isn’t better for a client (unless the photographer is simply bad at color correcting).

Wedding Photography by David Wittig

5) Do you use Lightroom and Photoshop? Or just one or the other? Why?

KEVIN’S ANSWER:

I’m versed in Lightroom, Aperture and Photoshop. We don’t use Photoshop in my studio; it’s too slow. I personally prefer Aperture, but  we use Lightroom frequently too.

Aperture has a more consistent, pleasing UI—which is very important to me. If you’re using a program for several hours at a time, the better it looks and feels, the more enjoyable your task becomes.

DAVE’S ANSWER:
Neither, we use Aperture and haven’t opened Photoshop in months. Photoshop is an extremely inefficient way to edit large quantities of images (and even small numbers of images). We can do everything we need to in Aperture, from culling, color correcting, adding film grain, and album design, to organizing, categorizing, backing up, and archiving our images. It may not be the absolute best in each of those categories (though it’s usually the in the top 2) but the efficiency that is gained by having one highly integrated tool is very worthwhile.

Do you agree or disagree, based on your unique business experience? Weigh in by leaving comments below!


To view the article on line go here.  To check out the freestyle Kosha performed about me go here and watch the slideshow!

Kosha Dillz and Freeway speak in tongues before A3C

Two MCs. Two religions. One mic.

by Rodney Carmichael @Rappin_Rodney

Freeway; Kosha Dillz

BIZ 3; ANDREA HANKS

Freeway; Kosha Dillz

New Jersey native Kosha Dillz would never be mistaken for the guy Mos Def was referring to when he rapped the now infamous line, “some tall Israeli is running this rap shit.” Despite his Jewish wink-of-a-stage name, Dillz is not that tall — nor is he cashing in on hip-hop on the same plane as former Island/Def Jam exec Lyor Cohen. Not yet, anyway. The closest the unsigned MC with a penchant for rhyming in Hebrew has probably come to seeing a fat a$$ check is when he toured the Czech Republic last year — get it, Czech Republic — with former Roc-A-Fella rapper and practicing Muslim Freeway. Though the two come from opposite sides of the religious aisle, they were both there to represent hip-hop — as they will again on the HipHopDX stage at this year’s A3C Fest. With the cross-cultural connect already established, CL eavesdropped on a conversation between them in preview of the show.

Kosha Dillz: I actually had grown up listening to you when I was about 18, 19 and it’s kinda funny because as a teen, I had come from more of a street life, too. We were listening to Freeway, doing whatever we were doing in New Brunswick, N.J., and then I had gone away and done time. Then I came out as Kosha Dillz and I became this sort of Jewish rapper, kind of iconic figure for Jewish kids. And Freeway, you’ve been one of the more successful rappers that converted to Islam and traveled to Mecca. And now we’re doing a show together and having this interview. So I just think that’s kinda ill.
Freeway: Yeah, definitely.

KD: What made you make the switch from your old life to your current life?
F: Well, you know I’m from Philadelphia and it’s basically a predominantly Islamic community that I grew up in. My mother was Christian and my father was in something kind of like a cult — it was this thing called the Nation of Alkebulan. It was this church where we talked about the betterment of black people, you know. So I was raised on that. Basically my father was the man of the household, so we had to do what he said to do. But once I was old enough, I explored religion I realized Islam is the religion for me.

KD: Are a lot of people reaching out to you as far as you becoming more publicly visible the longer you stay with it?
F: It’s people that know about me being Muslim that follow my music, and it’s people that follow my music that aren’t aware I’m a Muslim. It depends on how deep they listen and how much they observe my music, you know. But I do get people that say they’re happy to see me doing what I’m doing, and I do get people that say I need to leave that music alone. So it comes from both angles.

KD: I went to Jerusalem to learn how to Yeshiva — kinda like when you went out to Mecca and made the Hajj, Jewish kids go and study with rabbis and scholars and that’s a good place for me to create a lot of cool music in Israel. Is there any place like that that you might go, like take six months off to go study?
F: I definitely have plans to go back to Saudi Arabia and perform another Umrah and a Hajj. And definitely, I’m sitting down and studying with some people.

KD: Do you think you’ll record out there?
F: Oh naw, I don’t think I’ll be doing any recording out there. The thing that I do when I’m out there is I try to talk to the kids in that country and let them know how blessed they are in the Holy Land. ‘Cause a lotta kids over there look at the things we’re doing over here and think that it’s better than what they’re doing. When, in all actuality, it’s better where they’re at, ’cause they’re right there in the Holy Land where the Kaaba is, they’re in the land where we pray to, they’re in the land where all the scholars are — whereas we have to travel 15 hours on a plane to get over there, you know what I’m sayin’?
KD: For sure.

F: Do you feel like you’ve got more to prove to fans who might prejudge you based on what they see?
KD: Yeah, I just don’t think that Jews have had the largest success at being dope MCs. I mean, [we] had MC Serch and [we] have the Beastie Boys. I kinda have a lot of barriers, but I think persistence, commitment and perseverance is something that I want to [use to] prove myself. I’ve always been in that boat — always being doubted when I step into the arena.

F: Yeah, that’s like me. When I first got in the game I was counted out. They told me wouldn’t nobody want to hear a whole album of my raps cause my voice is annoying. I heard all kinds of stuff: Like I was the first rapper with a beard, young guy with this, like, weird Islam — it’s a lot of stuff that I’ve overcome, so I feel you.
KD: I always like the odd-ball-out because I’ve always been the odd-ball-out. I was at Rock the Bells and RZA brought me on stage and people were backstage thinking I was like his lawyer or something. So it’s always like something to prove. Do you think you would ever go and study in Israel, because the Golden Rock is out there and it’s the third holiest site for Muslims out in Israel?

F: Definitely, if the opportunity presented itself.
KD: I think it would be really cool. Everyone really knows you out there because Israel’s really big on that level of hip-hop. You would be the most prominent figure from hip-hop and Islam to study there, so I think that’d be a really cool bridging the gap, and positive even for Israel.
F: That’s what’s up, man.

KD: Have you had a lot of Jewish friends, like just around the way?
F: In Philly it’s not really a lot of Jewish people. In my hood it’s either you’re Christian or you’re Muslim. I mean I’m sure it’s Jewish people there, but they’re not on the forefront like that so I didn’t really have too many Jewish friends growing up.

KD: Well I’d love to invite you over for a Shabbat dinner or something like that when you come out to L.A. If there’s anything you want me to find out for you while [I'm] in Israel, if I can help you get out there with some of the Muslim dudes — [the rapper] Shine’s out there studying, so we could get the whole thing going on, you know.
F: Definitely, I’m open to it so we’ll do it.

KD: Freeway, man, let’s build. Let’s try to bang out a joint and shock the world, you know.
F: Definitely.

See full schedule of A3C Hip Hop Festival performances, panel discussions and demos atwww.a3cfestival.com.

Why Clients Need Fact Not Fiction-Kevin Weinstein

Over the past several years, wedding photography has become a fashionable, well-sought after way to make a living thanks to the ease of digital cameras, computers and software.

At the same time, wedding photographers more and more market themselves as “experts” to other wedding photographers with workshops, lectures, gadgets, software and photographic plug-in “actions.”  Photographers don’t just compete against one another, photographers now market to other photographers in orer to gain popularity, notoriety, money, create hype and status throughout the world.

 

MCA wedding photography

After 12 years of documentary and photojournalism experience, and now entering my 10th year in the wedding industry, I have never seen such change like the past few years.

In November, Junebug Weddings posted a call for submissions for their Best of Best 2010 wedding images.  The post read, “We will bring the most breathtakingly beautiful, emotionally touching, technically masterful, downright hilarious, outrageously innovative, and ridiculously AWESOME wedding photos of the year to fabulous couples and photo fanatics everywhere. We’ll be choosing 50 of the most outstanding images from 2010 and we’re calling out to photographers all over world to participate; that means you!”

I will start off by saying, I was not the gentleman who wrote Junebug Weddings regarding their call for submission for the Best of 2010.  I have been asked this questions several times.  If you recall, I went public with my concerns on Twitter within 30 minutes of the contest results, and engaged in a public, open dialogue with Christy Weber regarding my thoughts.  I had no reason or desire to create a temporary email address or write an anonymous threat letter to bully the ladies who run the blog.  I was more than happy and proud to have my name behind my concerns.  And my intent was merely to bring light to an issue plaguing the industry.

No, I did not win an image.  Am I mad?  Nah.  In this field, if you can’t take daily rejection, you need to move on.  I would still write this post even if I had won an image.

It never occurred to me that I could enter images taken at workshops, nor images from “collaborative editorial shoots” with other vendors, or even “test shoots” with hired friends who are stepping in as models wearing a white dress.  The line, “and ridiculously AWESOME wedding photos of the year … ” to me meant wedding photos. You know, those events we are handed over incredible sums of money to create high-art for the client who invested.  Yea, those events which are typically held on weekends.

Personally, I know of three people who won images whose photos were not from weddings.  Two were from workshops, and one was a friend/model which was shot on a weekday.  Not only does Junebug need to define their call for submissions guidelines better, but the ladies need to be much clearer about what constitutes a “wedding,”  As of right now, their definition of wedding goes beyond the actual wedding day and does not necessarily mean it was even a wedding to begin with.  As long as there is a lady in a white dress, the image is eligible for entry.  I can appreciate a post wedding shoot with the hired client, and feel that still is “legal.”  But to police a workshop image or friend-for-hire image is going to be tough.  Really tough.  In order for a contest to be legit and more important, respected, I beg Junebug to face this issue with intent and seriousness.  And I appluad the ladies for already taking this issue to their own blog and devoting a post to the topic: What Constitutes the Art of Wedding Photography? Real Weddings vs. Styled Shoots vs. Commercial Shoots.

This issue has been a complaint of mine for years.  And now is my time to finally share my concerns regarding a major issue that is running ramped in our industry.  Because of the rise of wedding blogs, and their hunger for daily content, we now have to define what is a “real wedding” or an “editorial shoot” so the viewer can decipher the difference while satiating their appetite for inspiration.  It is just like high school when we had to engage in discussions about what is the meaning of  “truth” or “love” after reading such stories like Catcher in the Rye.

It is important to note that wedding bloggers are nothing more than online magazines.  Thus, their concerns and goals are similar to a tangible magazine: sales, click rate, hits and advertising revenue.  As we all know, photographic images are key to sales.  Studies show that the most read stories of any newspaper are ones with images.  Photography is the most important to any companies brand and livelihood.

Over the past 7 years, workshops have exploded among the “names” in the industry holding 1, 2, 3-day and even week-long retreats offering newbies a chance to define their craft while shooting fake weddings with Ford models at workshops around the globe.  I have watched many photographers put these images on their blogs and personal web pages as if they shot these images at a wedding event on a Saturday.  Why is this problematic?  First off , it is lying and misleading your potential client.  False advertising.  And it is misrepresenting your ability to make pictures under deadlines and real time.  A bride is going to expect this level of imagery from her wedding.

When you have 1 day or 7 days to work with incredibly hot, gorgeous women whose makeup has been overly done for the shoot, the “bride” is a size 1, and the “groom” is also a professional model and both know exactly how to act, pose, stand, and be confident in front of a camera, you have an experience in front of you that is not equal to the reality of a wedding day.  A potential bride sees these images, and does not know how to decipher if they were a real couple from a real wedding or not.  When you have several days and all the time in the world to take pictures of models at workshops, you are doing yourself (the photographer) a disservice to your craft.

Think about it.   My clients are not models.  They have no idea how to pose.  They are rarely size 1, they are insecure about being in front of the camera, it is typically hot out in the summer, the groom is sweating due to his tux in July heat, we only have 1 hour to hit 2-3 locations because they don’t want to miss the cocktail hour, the wedding party is not cooperating,  I AM HOT, I am STRESSED beyond belief and can barely work myself out of this puzzle.  If I don’t get kick-ass images for my clients, then their investment of thousands of dollars, expecting compelling imagery, has gone to waste.  I will be in trouble.  You better be able to deliver.  You do not have days.  You have 15 minutes to a few hours.  There are no excuses on a wedding day.

Thrilled to be a former photojournalist, this part of the wedding is nothing more than an old routine for me.  The rules of journalism are so strict that I could not even move a glass of water 4 inches to get a better shot.  And I am honored to say, never in my journalism career did I tamper with reality.  I was forced to make compelling pictures by a process of elimination and solving pieces of the puzzle, while on strict deadlines, in order to bring back compelling pictures to my editor so I would not get fired.

So my question is, what are these blogs really offering brides and grooms?  Inspiration?  OK, that is valid.  But inspiration and non-reality seems to have won over reality.  Thus, now when a blog posts a wedding that is “real,” the industry has coined the term, “Real Wedding.”  But even then, most of the images the editors choose are the same types of imagery we see over and over: mostly the couple in empty fields, shot with tilt shift lenses, and rarely showing their event beyond a few “lovely” portraits and TONS of detail shots.  There is a lack of documentary photography displaying their day which is the core of what a wedding is REALLY about.   Where are the ceremony pictures, toasts, dancing, preparation, socializing at the cocktail hour?  All I see are pictures of couples with balloons, old luggage, staring blankly like American Gothic, against brightly colored door frames in gritty neighborhoods.

Taking compelling documentary-styled pictures while things are unraveling in real time is not easy and not for everyone.  And not everyone has the gift to be an artist.  Sure, if you keep doing it, you will get better.  Luckily, photography is technical, so anyone can master it to some degree.  But not everyone is given the true gift of the craft.  Just because you LOVE photography, does not mean you can be a photographer.  Thus, the digital transition has allowed people to think they can make a living doing their hobby.  And why not weddings!  The client is pretty uneducated, and if they hire you, you get a few thousand bucks.  #Score.

I am thrilled that the wedding photojournalism trend is dying down, and more fashion trends are rising.  And as a lot of people move towards this new trend, I plan on sticking to my roots and how I shoot best.  I have often been rewarded when not going with the flow and agitating my expertise.  I urge new people to shoot more.  Shoot often.  Shoot your friends at parties, your family on vacation.  Get used to movement and the obstacles they present.  Build an insurance bank so when the reality hits on a wedding day (can’t get far enough away from the subject, it is backlit, there is no light, people are in your way) you have experience and resources to draw upon. Force yourself to figure out how to make compelling pictures without setting anything up.

After 24 years, I have an insurance bank so large, I draw on this at each and every wedding.  Practice practice practice.  What’s better than a workshop?  Shoot along side a friend at a wedding.  The best part?  It is free and won’t cost you $2000.  And you will be dealing with the exact obstacles and realties you will face on your own.  Arm yourself with real experience, not a 3-day workshop with models.  It is easy to make pictures of a model posing like a sexy vixen hanging off the side of an airplane.  Learn to pose, fight the elements of hot or cold couples, unable-to-pose couples, natural “beauty” and major time constraints.

I promise, you will grow in ways you never expected.  And the work you deliver to a client will yield something similar to your web site. A web site is not only a personal vault, but your free ad like in a newspaper or magazine.  Treat it as so, and promote where you are in your talent.  You won’t be left behind, I promise.  People will hire you.  And when you make it to the big-time, you will feel great knowing you did it yourself.  Honesty.  Growth.  Passion.

Photographer’s marketing themselves to others in this this industry tends to take advantage of insecure, uneducated newbies who think that if they buy this next DVD, attend this workshop or purchase certain books that they will gain the fast track to success.  I have witnessed one photographer who shared with me how he got caught up in all the photography workshops, DVDs, books, conferences and after several years found himself broke with no money.  Literally.  His skills were no farther along than when he started.  There are no shortcuts to creating great art and being a fabulous photographer.  Re-tweeting the famous photographer’s products for sale and their marketing schemes does nothing for YOUR craft, and only puts money in their pockets.  That is the point.  Most often, you have been taken for a ride.  You will not rise to the top by befriending them.

I challenge you to dig deep inside yourself and find inspiration from within.  It will make you stronger in the long run.  Your goal should be to nurture your business and your art.  Practice.  Practice hard.  And practice often.  If you listen to your heart, ignore the trendy styles promoted by bloggers and shoot from your soul, you might just find incredible success is waiting for you.  Being a follower will make you mediocre.  Being a leader of yourself will make you unbeatable.

This is my 2 cents.

What they Said… [ 39 ]

Very well stated, Kevin.  With so much being tossed at us – products, workshops, posing guide, attire charts etc etc etc it does blur the lines.  Every photographer should just shoot for themselves and their clients and focus on their own business success.

Feb 02, 2011  /  Rachael Michael

As someone who was completely BLOWN away when I entered your studio and saw all those real images on your wall, I cannot agree more with what you just wrote

Feb 02, 2011  /  Shang

Kevin, so well said. I agree whole-heartedly with you! Although I don’t have quite the years of experience that you do, I resonate with a lot of what you are asserting. Bravo for putting this out there in a sales saturated industry where honesty or truth isn’t always a priority!

Feb 02, 2011  /  Meagan Lindsay Shuptar

Your post made me chuckle out loud. But you’re right!

Feb 02, 2011  /  Jasmine E.

I’m speechless – this is precisely how I feel and I’m a little jealous of your writing ability.  Thank you for writing this, I’ll be sharing it often.

Feb 02, 2011  /  Lucas

Well written and well conceived. I agree with you completely – thank you for writing this!

Feb 02, 2011  /  Shelley Paulson

I cheered out loud and made my assistant listen to me read her parts of this post. We both agree with you 10,000%. I’ve never done a workshop to learn how to shoot like other people. I’ve done one for lighting that was a big help in a skill set gap that I had, and I’ve done several that are business related that helped me out on the business side of things. Some more than others. But I really don’t get why someone would want to do a workshop to learn to shoot like someone else. (I did attend a shooting workshop, but it was mainly for the trip to Mexico as a business expense.)

Thank you for writing this!

Feb 02, 2011  /  Christine

Kevin,

Thank you.

Extremely well written and solid points.

Now we need to educate the brides how to hire the true professionals… not the trendy names, over actioned, I’ll fix it in post, 4000 frames a wedding cause 7 sprayed shots is better than the one perfect composed and captured image and I’ll give you a disc w/ 15hrs shoot for $800 “professional photographer”

Feb 02, 2011  /  Jason

Amen!

It is such an issue in our industry and you have ever so eloquently touched on it.  I have a heart for education and often share with newer photographers, I have built an intern and associate program so people with heart and dedication can learn the skill and practice.  What I get in return financially is small compared to the satisfaction of seeing their confidence grow and the images they take.

Workshops, lectures and teachers them selves are not wrong but are often structured incorrectly and do not focus on the true sharing of wisdom.  It’s almost as if they are watering down the quality of our profession.  If only the publications understood your points, the cool shots are not as complicated with no time constraints and that a truly beautiful real wedding had bumps, late family members, missing officiants, the wrong flower in the brides bouquet and hairs that fell out of place with some vigorous and fun dancing.

Feb 02, 2011  /  Tracy Autem

One of the best photography blog posts I have ever read! Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts!

Feb 03, 2011  /  Gwendolyn Tundermann

“I challenge you to dig deep inside yourself and find inspiration from within.  It will make you stronger in the long run.  Your goal should be to nurture your business and your art.  Practice.  Practice hard.  And practice often.  If you listen to your heart, ignore the trendy styles promoted by bloggers and shoot from your soul, you might just find incredible success is waiting for you.  Being a follower will make you mediocre.  Being a leader of yourself will make you unbeatable.  ”

Kudos.

This is what I have been having strong feelings about for several years, and this is why I encourage others and I personally stay away from getting inspired by the trends, and work from my own soul. The art is in me, not in the trends of others. One year I went to 5 workshops and learned a little, but was frustrated, because… well, I could see how they were manipulating and taking advantage of people, by dangling a bit of knowledge that felt good to hear, but when you took it all home, it didn’t really have a lot of meat. So basically a waste of money and time which I could have found out the same info by practicing myself.

Feb 03, 2011  /  Kimberly Naranjo

Much like the “State of the Union”, this is truly the “State of the wedding photo industry”, put as honestly as it possibly could be. Now we need to find a positive way to convey this same message to many undereducated brides. How in the world is this tactfully done without sounding like a “whiner”? I’d love to be able to link to this post.

Feb 03, 2011  /  Jim Nedresky

Kevin, what an impressive post so full of things that many of us want to say, but find ourselves trying to find the words to articulate.

I hope that this message of “getting back to reality” will spread through our industry.

Thanks for sharing this wonderful post.

Feb 03, 2011  /  Katie Humphreys

Amen.

Feb 03, 2011  /  John Wohlfeil

Thank you, Kevin. Someone needed to say it smile

And don’t even get me started on the American Gothic imagery! LOL.

Many years later, couples want to remember exactly how they felt on their wedding day, not how and where I told them to stand. Authenticity wins in the end.

Feb 03, 2011  /  Rachel LaCour Niesen

To read seventy other blog posts on this topic which Junebug raised a couple of weeks ago, check out our Photobug blog and readhttp://junebugweddings.com/blogs/photobug/archive/2011/01/17/what-constitutes-the-art-of-wedding-photography.aspx. The conversation was very respectful and many differing viewpoints on what constitutes a great wedding photographer were given. Some photographers believe that photojournalistic pictures taken at weddings are the only thing that should be consider as great images, some photographers feel that the work they put into pre-visualizing a photograph is an art-form all its own. The owners of Junebug all attended fine-art photography school and at the time our teachers did not consider wedding photography of any kind to be an art form. We celebrate the art of wedding photography and we believe that some incredible work is being done by wedding photographers off all kinds.

Feb 03, 2011  /  Blair

Wedding Photography = Photography (Photographs) of a Wedding.

Period.

Anything else is a photo shoot that might have a wedding theme but in no way should ever be confused with Wedding Photography. Pre-conceptualizing a photograph on the day of the wedding is allowed because your still under the same constraints but, I’m sorry, a workshop does not count. Neither does models. I’m not even sure why this needs to be discussed, especially to people who attended a fine-art photography school.

Feb 03, 2011  /  Chris Whitcomb

Awesome post, and I could not agree with you more.  I have been completely disillusioned with the flood of “Get Rich Quick” photography workshops, DVD’s, and wanna-be Photographer “Rock Stars”.  I started my formal education in photography in my Sophomore year of high school (way back in 1978) and shot my first two weddings in 1982 before deciding it was not worth the risk of ruining someone’s wedding photography through my lack of experience.  In 2005, I switched from film to digital, was inspired to revisit wedding photography again and, in preparation for that, shot 51 weddings as second shooter within 13 months alongside about a dozen different lead photographers before I felt I had the experience (and the right) to call myself a wedding photographer.  It saddens me when I see someone get their first Canon Rebel for Christmas and by Summer, they are putting up a web site, getting biz cards printed, and calling themselves a professional wedding photographer!  Worse… I don’t see a way to stop the madness!

Feb 04, 2011  /  Loren Scott

Thank you for illuminating this issue~  I have shared the same concern for some time now!  Well written and much appreciated!

Feb 04, 2011  /  Lacey Yantis

What a bold and well-written blog article.  I couldn’t agree with you more.  Thank you for this!  smile

Feb 05, 2011  /  Betsy

Kevin,
One of the reasons we chose you as our photographer is because of your blog. You have a very personal voice when you write here- which is so endearing! I appreciated the realness of your images- and that all sorts of weddings, all sorts of brides and grooms were being shown. We knew what to expect- but had no idea how the images would look!

That says a lot when the majority of sites I found were canned pictures- in perfect weather, with skinny models, with a ton of time on their hands to get pictures taken…

You and your craft are appreciated! smile I know you know that!

Feb 06, 2011  /  Colleen

This is a fantastic read, Kevin; you continue to be an inspiration with your work and your words!

Feb 07, 2011  /  Steve

Thanks so much for this post, I feel like authentic, real weddings are so much more compelling than the “American Gothic” style so popular in photo blogs and magazines. I’m a photojournalistic shooter myself, and can’t imagine shooting any other way for a wedding or a family – feeling is so much more important. =)

Permission to post a link to this and discuss a bit in my photoblog?

Feb 10, 2011  /  Twyla

I’m so happy that you are saying this.  It seems like I get so caught up in my local market and what my potential clients are looking at that I feel alone in the conviction.  I couldn’t take it any longer, I actually am launching a completely new website to speak my own voice again.  I find my couples seems to think that they find out what they want from looking at wedding blogs rather than looking at wedding blogs to find the vendors that can give them what they want.

Thanks again.

Feb 10, 2011  /  Tim Larsen

Twyla:

Absolutely.  Thanks for your post.

Be well.

Feb 10, 2011  /  Kevin Weinstein

Hi Kevin,

Thanks for your words. Incredibly well thought out, and challenging. I appreciate you providing some push-back and a little reality check to the current trend of the ‘styled shoot’.
I’ll be sharing this link for sure.

Erica

Feb 13, 2011  /  Erica Rose

I’m not a photographer, so the differences in types of photography (true photojournalism, staged, etc) don’t mean as much to me as they do to some people, but I do agree that a wedding is a specific event. Staged photoshoots may be art, but they are not weddings and the difference is usually not obvious to people who are not involved in the wedding industry (one only needs to read the comments on any bride’s tumblr page to see the truth of that). Also, as a non-photogenic person (one of my eyes is almost always half-closed in photos, flash or no), photos with models mean nothing to me when I’m selecting someone to take photos. I judge photographers on their ability to take great photos of normal people like me and make them look good regardless of how unphotogenic they may be.

Feb 17, 2011  /  Liene Stevens

Glad to be reading this, thank you.

Feb 17, 2011  /  Maplin

I could not agree with you more.  There are many photographers who get into this wedding industry all the time and follow these big shots who sell their “secret” to instant success.  Frankly, many of these speakers offer no more than slight motivation and not much more.  In order to succeed in this business, as well as anything else, everyone has to make the right choices, market themselves correctly, and earn their stripes by shooting anything and everything.  Everyday is a new experience to learn.

P.S. – I submitted into that Junebug competition too.  ^_^

Feb 22, 2011  /  Douglas Chan-Wing

Kevin,

You nailed it.  You summed up a growing and evil cloud of greed that lurks over the industry.  I’ve seen *good* photographers go astray with the lure of easy money (by targeting photographers instead of brides).

That’s why I’ve never submitted to a contest.  Ever.  I’ve tried to be careful of proving myself to other photographers.  That popularity contest is getting old.  “Award-winning Photographer” doesn’t mean what it should.

I shot to my heart’s delight and now I’m 100x the photographer I was 5 years ago.  That’s something I keep and I earned.  Now I’m doing commercial work on the side, where the smoke and mirrors of the wedding industry don’t work.  It’s where the old mantra, “oh, it’s a little back-focused….just make it black and white” will not get by.  The work ethic and professional growth you described above is exactly what is saving my butt with clients that know better.

Our couples deserve that quality, even if they don’t know the difference.

Thank you for your brilliant insight and hindsight.  You nailed it.

-gavin
gavinphotography.com
holtp.com

Feb 22, 2011  /  Gavin Holt

I wish, wish, wish this was required reading for each and every wedding photographer who ever picked up a camera and wrote a blog. You nailed every single note and gave voice to so much of my frustration with the industry, from the “real weddings” to the American Gothic wedding day portrait.

I proudly consider myself a “wedding photojournalist” and have been very happy that so many of the couples who choose to work with me have commented on that attribute of my work. I will freely admit I am not the best portrait artist in town and I still have a lifetime ahead of me for evolving and perfecting my craft. But like you, I feel it is something that strongly differentiates my work from other “photojournalists” whose blogs are dominated by portrait after portrait.

Mar 02, 2011  /  Chris Aram

This is the best post I have read in a long, long time. Thank you for sharing your outlook. I do agree that presenting model brides and grooms on a web site is misleading. I feel sick in my stomach when I head photographers complain about having to shoot a wedding with an ugly couple. I think that everyone is beautiful and deserves to be treated as such : )

Mar 10, 2011  /  Life with Kaishon

I finally came across a real teacher giving some valuable advices. I am so tired of seeing copycats everywhere, at the end, we don’t even know who is copying whom, who started the old leather cases and the emotionless faces in front of a brick wall? They do not mean anything to the couple, they might be trendy, but won’t last the test of time. And those outrageous workshops, some charge $1200 for 2 half days, is it worth it? Do people improve their skills at all from these? Love what you wrote in the last paragraph, as an artist, it is a process of self-discovery in the journey, and an artist shoot photos with their hearts. Really appreciate your insights and bravery.

Mar 24, 2011  /  June

Incredible.  Great words of wisdom here and I’m all the more proud that someone said what’s on their mind and my mind.

-Marc

Apr 07, 2011  /  Marc

So true!  It would be nice to get the word out.

May 11, 2011  /  Valeri

I love your bold statements about the trends in the business. I just wanted to say that I’m one whose passion started with documentary photography and I pursued that dream through actual photojournalism (the kind you study and earn a degree for, the kind that pushes you to tell human stories by stepping into the lives of your subjects out of passion and a desire not to take their money but to tell their story) After a decade in news I happened to have a life change that moved my focus toward families and yes, weddings. I shot them the only way I knew how. This happened to coincide with the ‘photojournalistic’ approach to wedding photography that did indeed flood the market. While I resented some of the trendy approaches, the tilted angles and cliche scenes, I continued to shoot the only way I knew how. And as years have progressed I admit to being sorely lacking in the business end (I’m desperately working on that) but my approach hasn’t changed. In fact, I’m finding that the more filters and effects and video montage options I have within reach, the less I want to use them and the more I find myself yearning to shoot less and display exactly what I saw with very little interference in the original image. Think Henri Cartier-Bresson among many other pioneers who emphasized thoughtful, judicious shooting. I have soo much to learn and far to go still but when I start to doubt my lack of motivation for diving into the latest trend I am relieved to know that there is still a place for telling the story in the purest form. I do hate that the titled I worked hard to earn and once was proud to wear is now considered such a cop-out because the photojournalists I personally learned from were James Nactwey and Nick Ut and I see very little resemblance in the wedding photographers who now tout that name.

Jun 08, 2011  /  Seanna

Thank you for your genuine honesty.

Jun 29, 2011  /  Patty

I am so glad someone is speaking out against this sort of thing in our industry. There are so many people (and blogs, and entire wedding “organizations”) out there who I think are misleading clients, and it’s shameful. What really gets me is the new wave of preferred vendor badges from “invitation only” blogs… Blogs that invite everyone, and then charge an obscene amount of money to be a part of the club. Brides think the vendor deserved the accolade, when instead they just ponied up the cash. It’s embarrassing. Thanks for the guiding light.

Aug 08, 2011  /  Nathan Welton

Kevin,
Goes without saying that your ideas are very well written.  But I’ll say it again anyway:  they are!  Thanks for taking the time.  As a photographer relatively new to the business (7 years), all I’ve really known comes from my influences here in the southeast and from a few popular publications.  From information I’ve obtained by reading and observing this century’s earlier masters, true photojournalism is often claimed and rarely understood by both photographers and clients here in my region.  I suspect it’s the case throughout the U.S.  Our market is inundated these days with misrepresentations and facades.  The topics you touched on above are just additions to an industry whose lines have become increasingly blurred.

I personally don’t agree with the means by which these blogs obtain content.  But they are not just driving the “look” of the industry.  They’re feeding the demand as well.  They’re supplying imagery for impatient and short-sighted consumers who “demand” colorful, pristine, contrived photography.

You’re right to focus on your ideal client and meet the needs that they have – by being true to yourself and your profession!

Sep 04, 2011  /  Jason

Wow!  I couldn’t be more excited!  For our September PUG we have the priveldge of meeting at Brody Dezember‘s NEW Studio in downtown Salt Lake City!  Brody will talk to us a little about his workflow as well as how he integrates Pictage products and services into that workflow for his studio.  We will also have refreshments!

Date: Wednesday September 28, 2011

Time: Gather at 6:30, program starts at 7:00 p.m.

Location: 423 West 800 South in Downtown Salt Lake City.

Please RSVP so Brody and I will know how many people to plan for.  You can email me at andrea@andreahanksphotography.com or text me at 801-349-0718.

As always, our PUG meetings are free and open to anyone!

Go here to see the post online.

 17. AUG, 2011

Summer Collaboration 2011 from Jared Wortley with Oneilove Media on Vimeo.

Capturing the perfect grace, style & beauty to your wedding is easy when you have a team of experts to help you.  This group of wedding vendors shows off their talents as they created this 2011 summer collaboration.  Jared with Oneilove media showcased the event perfectly.  Each vendor played an extremely important role that helped create the perfect look.  Check out this fantastic showcase & get inspired to create your own perfect masterpiece… Your Wedding!!

Photography by~Andrea Hanks Photography

Every bride deserves to have grace, style & beauty on your special day.  The perfect addition to your personal attire & style would have to be one of the gorgeous cars at Something Vintage Something Blue.  You will not only get the royal treatment by their amazing service but you also will be showing up, exiting or both in style.  Something Vintage Something Blue is excited to be debut their newest additions to their Royal Family Magnolia & Sunshine.

Magnolia is a 1964 Rolls Royce Silver Cloud III.  More details about this amazing beauty can be found on Something Vintage Something Blue’s website.  You can also find out more information about having them be part of your special day.  After all doesn’t every bride deserve the royal treatment on her special day & have the luxury of getting first class treatment in this cars that were made for royalty.  Something Vintage Something Blue offers an incredible service at an affordable price.  Check them out HERE.




Sunshine is a 1936 Chevrolet Master DeLuxe.  Isn’t she gorgeous?  For more details about this fabulous car be sure to check out details about it on Something Vintage Something Blue’s website HERE.


The Mccune Mansion is one of Utah’s most beautiful venues.  This historic building offers a unique style.  It’s charm beauty doesn’t just carry on the outside but on the inside as well.   If you are looking for a venue fit for a princess you just may have found it at the Mccune Mansion.  Be sure to visit their website HERE.


These gorgeous gowns are from Alta Moda Bridal & Lily & Iris.  These two dress Boutiques offer the latest fashions to the pickiest of brides as well as bridesmaids dresses.  They keep up with the latest trends & styles in the wedding industry so you can trust that they will know how to take care of you when you are on the hunt for your wedding gown & for your bridal party as well.

Mccu
These hair updo’s are a work of art.  Dallan Flint is a master when it comes to hair.  He has proven himself to me in these gorgeous images.  Getting the perfect look to your special day isn’t easy but if you choose someone to help you create the perfect style for you on your special day you won’t go wrong.  Be sure to know what it is you like & what you know looks good on you before you go to have your hair done.  Your stylist may have something else in mind so communicate with your stylist to make sure you both are on the same page.  Taking your dress, hair piece, veil or any other embellishment you want used in your hair is a must when you are getting your hair done for your wedding.  Be sure to do a trial run before your big day to make sure it is just how you want it.

Daniela Rowson knows how to create the perfect look for any bride.  Her flawless make up techniques are perfect for any bride wanting to look her very best.  Daniela knows how to create looks that not only look great in person but on print.  You know that your images will turn out just as beautiful as you look in person.  Be sure to check out more of Daniela’s amazing work on her website HERE.


Andrea Hanks Photography captured all the beauty in this fantastic shoot.  Andrea has an incredible talent to pull out sharp rich colors in her photos and all of her pictures have a certain class to them that is tough to describe but you can definitely see it in her work .  For more information about her & see more of her work be sure to check out her website HERE.


Those Who Made it all Happen

Location~ McCune Mansion

Photography~ Andrea Hanks Photography

Videography~ One I love Media

Dresses~ Alta Moda Bridal Lily & Iris

Hair~Hair by Dallan Flint

Make Up~Daniela Rowson

Models~ Shariana, Scott, Aly Kesler, Hanna

Cars~  Something Vintage Something Blue

Photography by~Andrea Hanks Photography

Save the date for our August PUG Meeting which will be on August 31st at 6 p.m.

Wedding season will start winding down soon and so I thought it would great to take a break from the wedding craziness and provide a different type of shooting opportunity. The shoot will be geared towards encouraging each of us to make the shoot a bit more abstract than we normally shoot (framing, angles, lighting etc.) and/or try something different (shoot shallow, with off camera flash, etc.)

We will be meeting in the courtyard of the downtown Salt Lake City Library at 6 p.m. and from there we will move around downtown with our model and just get creative together! If you have ideas for props, location or clothing please let me know or bring them along! I always value your input. As always, PUGS are free to join and you don’t need to be a Pictage Member to attend! Remember to join us on our SLC PUG Facebook Page here. https://www.facebook.com/pages/Pictage-User-Group-Salt-Lake-City-Utah/141985765868807

If you have any questions please feel free to email me. My cell phone number is 801-349-0718 if you need to text/call me on the day of the shootl

Address to the library: 210 East 400 South Salt Lake City, UT 84111

Attached is a photo of the model we will be shooting.

Top 10 Signs of a Bad Photographer written by Damien Franco

Not everyone out there with a DSLR is a good photographer. It’s true. No really. There are endless discussions about it all over the Internet. Don’t believe me? Do an image search of, well, just about anything and you’ll see. That’s okay though because we’re all learning how to hone our craft, right?

So how do you spot the good photographers from the bad photographers?

And more importantly, how do you avoid looking like a bad photographer?

Lens cap by khiscott

Well, I asked my Twitter followers if there were ways to identify a bad photographer and we’ve come up with a top ten list.

  1. @MinnesotaDogGuyToo many to mention- #1 is the “anything goes” mentality– more crap produced in the last 15 years than the previous100 years” Well, that sounds like a solid number 1 to me. And it’s probably true. Maybe it’s because digital photography makes it so easy to capture tons of pics but it’s like nobody slows down anymore. Take your camera off burst mode, look a the scene, think about it, pause, think about it some more, then take a couple of shots and move on. Sure, there are times when you’ve got to take a ton of pics, but come on! I used to shoot weddings with film and when I hear of photographers who do it now and pop out thousands of photos on one wedding it kinda blows my mind. Too much spray and pray and you’re giving yourself away.
  1. @moogybooblesone who is all bitchy to newbies! If they are good then why should they worry about competition and put others down?” This one was hands down my favorite. We all started from somewhere and if you’re not contributing anything positive to the conversation then you’re acting like a bad photographer! Helping newer photographers out instead of putting them down would do wonders for your Karma and build your network as well.
  2. @sztyuiphotoUsing pop-up flash with telephoto lens in camera green mode:) And hold the camera in a very wrong unimaginable way:D” Sure, cameras are really great at doing most of the “work” for you these days, but really? The balance of technical know-how and artistic vision is what makes a good photographer. Besides, if you haven’t learned how to hold your camera properly yet…
  3. @kuymanPolarizer on indoors / shoots a whole roll with lens cap on (RF only, of course).” Yeah, if you’re going to use a polarizer you should probably know what it’s actually used for. Now, I do have to admit, I’ve taken a random shot here or there with the lens cap on but a whole roll?
  4. @rpwpbCutting off feet in a family snapshot.” We’re photographers not surgeons. ‘Nuff said.
  5. @Ashtonsthe same person in many of their portfolio shots” Yep, that’s a sure sign you really haven’t done that many shoots. Go get some more clients and then update your portfolio.
  6. @auryaunexample: only shoots “polaroids”. Naughty photographer!” Wha? You mean I shouldn’t be doing that anymore?
  7. @CLS_photosomeone who doesn’t know what apeture is or what is does let alone how to change it.” This goes along with that whole “P does not stand for Professional” argument and could also get classified with @isbalcioshoots in auto mode“. I got tons of those types of responses.
  8. @ChokingDramaWhen most or all pictures have signs of camera shake.” This basically means you don’t understand shutter speed or perhaps it’s relation to focal length. Either way…
  9. @mmurrayphotoone who says they’ll just “fix it” in lightroom/photoshop later after a bad exposure.” and then added “anyone who uses “Photoshop” as a verb. #photoshopisnotaverb” Yep…Photoshop…let the arguments begin!
  10. @krowland3Focused more on gear than quality of images.” I have nothing to add here. Nailed it!

Yeah, I know, we missed something or you completely disagree with one of the signs.

10. JUN, 2011

Photo by~Andrea Hanks Photography

Finding the perfect headpiece can be a bit of a challenge for many brides.  If you want something specific or custom Modest Couture by Elizabeth is just what you need.  They have a variety of looks, colors & designs.   The best part is that she can design a custom headpiece just for you.  Here is a sample of what they have to offer.

Bridal Headpieces

Written By~Modest Couture by Elizabeth

I love creating custom bridal headpieces! It is such a pleasure to personally work with each bride to create all of the veils, hats, birdcage veils, and fascinators.  It is so much fun to brainstorm with each of you to come up with the perfect piece for your big day!

Some of my different headpiece types include:  Birdcage veils, blushers, long traditional veils, pillbox hats, fabric flower fascinators, feather fascinators, headbands and the new “Kate Middleton” hat.

Photo by~Magnifique Photography

Feather fascinators have really come into their own as of late.  A feather fascinator is a great way to top off your outfit perfectly for your big day or for any special occasion.  Feather fascinators can be made from a variety of feathers including marabou or ostrich.  They can be put on a comb or a clip.  Because all my fascinators are completely custom made for each bride or bridesmaid, you can choose the size, colors, types of feathers and the adornments included.  They can be worn individually or with a birdcage veil depending on the look you are trying to achieve.

Photo by~Creativ Productions

Pill box hats are one of my specialties.  These are a classic look from the 1960’s that many brides are opting for because they are so unique.  There are very few who actually make pillbox hats anymore.  I love them!  They can be done in a variety of ways to customize them to complement your wedding gown.

Photo by~Modest Couture by Elizabeth

One of my newer hats is the “Kate Middleton” style of hat.  It is a small tear-drop shaped hat worn high on the head, usually adorned with lace, Russian veiling and a few strategically placed feathers, and sometimes a piece of bling.  Kate Middleton and other London socialites wear these frequently.  They are such a fun way to add romance and fun to a wedding.

Headbands can be any width you choose, from very narrow to wide.  They can include veiling, flowers, beads, bling or anything you or I can imagine.  These look especially great on brides with ultra-short hair!  Flower girls love them too!

Photo by~Jon Woodbury Photography

Birdcage veils can be made in almost any length, shape and size.  I like to make them separately so they can be used with hats, flowers, feathers or headbands!  They are such a fun accessory!

Photo by~Andrea Hanks Photography

 

Photo by~Jon Woodbury Photography

Photo by~ Andrea Hanks Photography

Photo by~ Jon Woodbury Photography

Photo by~ Creativ Productions

Be sure to visit Modest Couture by Elizabeth’s website here & you if you have questions you may contact her by email at: inquiry@modestcouturebyelizabeth.com.